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Creatures Death Eaters

In Defence Against the Dark Arts, Moody shows the Unforgivable Curses

“So - straight into it. Curses. They come in many strengths and forms. Now, according to the Ministry of Magic, I’m supposed to teach you countercurses and leave it at that. I’m not supposed to show you what illegal Dark curses look like until you’re in the sixth year. You’re not supposed to be old enough to deal with it till then. But Professor Dumbledore’s got a higher opinion of your nerves, he reckons you can cope, and I say, the sooner you know what you’re up against, the better."
-- Mad-Eye Moody

In Defence Against the Dark Arts, Moody shows the Unforgivable Curses

Mad-Eye Moody’s first Defence Against the Dark Arts class for the fourth years is a demonstration:

“You can put those away,” he growled, stumping over to his desk and sitting down, “those books. You won’t need them.”
They returned the books to their bags, Ron looking excited.

He proceeds to show them each of the three Unforgivable Curses, one after the other, using an unfortunate spider as his victim. For the demonstration of the Imperius Curse, Moody uses Harry as his test subject. During the demonstration, Harry is surprised to discovers that he is able to shake off its effects.

Neville Longbottom is particularly upset after watching Moody Crucio a spider because of what happened to his parents.

Timeline Notes

The fourth year Gryffindors have this Defence Against the Dark Arts class on the first Thursday of the school year.

“Moody!” he said. “How cool is he?”

“Beyond cool,” said George, sitting down opposite Fred.

“Supercool,” said the twins’ best friend, Lee Jordan, sliding into the seat beside George. “We had him this afternoon,” he told Harry and Ron.

Ron dived into his bag for his schedule.

“We haven’t got him till Thursday!” he said in a disappointed voice (GF13).

The class started right after lunch.

The Gryffindor fourth years were looking forward to Moody’s first lesson so much that they arrived early on Thursday lunchtime and queued up outside his classroom before the bell had even rung (GF13).

Commentary

Notes

The contrast between the way Moody starts his class and the way Umbridge starts her the following year is very telling:

Moody:

“You can put those away, those books. You won’t need them.”
They returned the books to their bags, Ron looking excited.

Umbridge:

"Well, good afternoon!" she said, when finally the whole class had sat down.
A few people mumbled 'good afternoon' in reply.
"Tut, tut," said Professor Umbridge. "That won't do, now, will it? I should like you, please, to reply 'Good afternoon, Professor Umbridge.' One more time, please. Good afternoon, class!"
"Good afternoon, Professor Umbridge," they chanted back at her.
"There, now," said Professor Umbridge sweetly. "That wasn't too difficult, was it? Wands away and quills out, please."
Many of the class exchanged gloomy looks; the order 'wands away' had never yet been followed by a lesson they had found interesting. (OP12)

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