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WOMBAT test 3 coverW.O.M.B.A.T. Test - Grade 3

W.O.M.B.A.T. Grade 3 appeared behind the Door on Rowling's website on June 13, 2007 and ended 5 days later on June 18th.

The W.O.M.B.A.T. Grade 1 appeared on March 31, 2006.
Grade 2 appeared on September 29, 2006.

The introduction to the WOMBAT grade 3 test said:

Unlike the O.W.L.s, the W.O.M.B.A.T.s consist exclusively of written papers. Therefore W.O.M.B.A.T.s could be sat by Muggles as well as wizards, although the Wizarding Examinations Authority does not believe that any Muggle would have the degree of inner-knowledge required to achieve a pass.

The Grade 1 W.O.M.B.A.T. tests the candidate on everyday wizarding laws, domestic spells, magical transport and magical plants and creatures; Grade 2, magical beings and objects, wizarding current affairs, and the Muggle world.

The Grade 3 W.O.M.B.A.T. will test you on Magical History; the bodies and laws of the International Wizarding Community; Magical Theory, and Dark Magic.

The Grade 3 W.O.M.B.A.T. is the final examination, and the most difficult. Not only is the subject matter much more advanced, but the examination is also more stringently marked. Certain answers will LOSE YOU MARKS, so choose carefully...

This is still not a straightforward Harry Potter trivia test. While a thorough knowledge of the books is essential to achieving a good grade at all levels of W.O.M.B.A.T., you will need inspiration as well as information, applying what you know, whether by deducing the correct answer or by making intelligent guesses.

If you would like to sit the Grade 3 W.O.M.B.AT, you will need 35 minutes.

It will take a few days for the Ministry to mark your test, after which the delivery owl will reveal your result in the form of a printable certificate. And so, for the final time... good luck.

The test is reproduced below with commentary by Lexicon staffmembers Lisa Waite Bunker, John Kearns, and Belinda Hobbs. The purpose of this commentary is to help those who want to be reminded of handy canon details or who want to consider some of the implications of what we do or don't know. The commentary is not intended to give specific answers in most cases, but rather to provide support information so that the test taker can formulate their own answers most effectively. Remember, in many cases, there is no way for us Muggles to know the exact correct answer, so feel free to make your best guess.

See the WOMBAT tests page for more about the past W.O.M.B.A.T.s.

Jump to Question:
1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5 -
6.1 - 6.2 - 6.3 - 6.4 - 6.5 - 6.6 -
7.1 - 7.2 - 7.3 - 7.4 - 7.5 - 7.6 - 7.7 - 7.8 - 7.9 - 7.10 -
8 - 9 - 10 - 11 - 12 - 13 - 14 -
15.1 - 15.2 - 15.3 - 15.4 - 15.5 - 15.6 - 15.7

GRADE 3


PART ONE
Magical History
(Points available: 30 out of a possible 100)


1. In your opinion, which of the following contributed MOST to the introduction of the International Statute of Wizarding Secrecy in 1692? Choose ONE.
    a. widespread persecution of wizarding children by Muggles
    b. escalating attempts by Muggles to force witches and wizards to perform magic for Muggle ends
    c. escalating attempts by Muggles to force witches and wizards to teach them magic
    d. increasing numbers of witch-burnings
    e. increasing numbers of Muggles being burned in mistake for witches
    f. failure of Ministry of Magic Delegation to Muggle King and Queen (William and Mary) begging for protection under Muggle law

Commentary:
Background: We don't know much about this statute except that Dobby's hover charm and Harry's Patronus in Little Whinging violated Section 13 (CS2 and OP2). According to Harry's letter from Mafalda Hopkirk, "any magical activity that risks notice by members of the non-magical community (Muggles) is a serious offense under section 13 of the International Confederation of Warlocks' Statute of Secrecy." (CS2)

Lisa: f (failure of Ministry of Magic Delegation) because I think drastic change like the statute was probably caused by a crisis of some sort, and not mere "escalation." It fits well too, with c. 1692 British history, as Roman Catholics, Protestant nonconformists (Presbyterians, Congregationalists, Baptists, etc.) and non-Christians were pressing for official tolerance. An "Act of Toleration" was passed in 1689 but it only applied to Protestant religions.

John: To me it's a toss-up between (e) and (f). It doesn't strike me that any Muggle would persecute wizarding children and get away with it for long (a); it would be tough for Muggles to 'force' wizards to do much of anything (b&c); and witch burnings are irrelevant thanks to the Flame-Freezing Charm (d) (PA1). Let's go with...(f).

Belinda: I chose (d) because the date of the introduction is 1692, the same year as the Salem witch burnings, and I doubt that's a coincidence. Answer e is also connected to this, but the increasing numbers in general covers both Muggles and wizarding folk. I forgot about the Flame-Freezing Charm, John! But yeah... I chose (d).

2. Which of the following did NOT provoke one of the bloody goblin rebellions of the 17th and 18th centuries? Choose ONE.
    a. the allegation by goblin king Ragnuk the First that Godric Gryffindor had stolen his sword
    b. the pursuit and imprisonment of Ug the Unreliable, who had been peddling Leprechaun Gold
    c. the accidental death of Nagnok, Gringotts Goblin, at the hands of an untrained security troll sent by the Ministry of Magic
    d. the imprisonment of the notoriously violent Hodrod the Horny-Handed, who had attempted to kill three wizards
    e. the public ducking in the village pond, by a gang of young wizards, of goblin activist Urg the Unclean
    f. The Ministry of Magic Decree of 1631, preventing all magical beings other than wizards carrying a wand.

Commentary:

Lisa: This is pretty easy if you believe that Godric Gryffindor is too honorable to steal (a).

John: Hogwarts is 1000 years old. I can't see how Godric Gryffindor could steal the sword of a goblin who lived at least 600 years later, or how an allegation of such would hold much credence. I'd go with (a).

Belinda: I disagree. I think an unfounded allegation of thievery is just the kind of thing that would cause a goblin rebellion. I went for (b) thinking that maybe the goblins would themselves not approve of peddling leprechaun gold and so would not be up in arms over Ug's imprisonment. But all these incidents prove that goblins don't take kindly to wizards messing with them, huh?

Lisa: I just realized that "the imprisonment of the notoriously violent Hodrod the Horny-Handed" is an utterly impossible cause because he lived in the 20th Century (if he is the same Hodrod the Horny-Handed as mentioned in the Daily Prophets).

3. Choose the Ministry of Magic decision that, in your estimation, had the MOST DAMAGING effect on present day wizarding life.
    a. The creation of the International Statute of Wizarding Secrecy in 1692.
    b. The defeat of the Appeal Against House-Elf Slavery in 1973.
    c. The drive into hiding of the surviving giants in the early 1980s.
    d. The 1865 decision to leave full control of Gringotts in goblin hands.
    e. The Wand Ban of 1631, which forbade Non-Human Magical Beings to carry wands.

Commentary:

Lisa: The Wand Ban (e), because it damaged the ability of wizards to collaborate with Non-Human Magical Beings such as the Centaurs and Goblins. Additionally, by stripping the Beings of the control one gains from a wand, one could argue that the balance of power between magicians and others was tipped too much in the wizards' favor.

John: I struggled with this one, because I had a hard time imagining a wizard considering any of these to be particularly damaging to their lives. I think I went with the Statute of Secrecy (a), just because it prevents wizards from doing things like celebrating the downfall of Voldemort without being noticed. I don't like the answer, but it seems least wrong.

Belinda: I went with (a) because even though it is mostly a beneficial statute, it has such a broad impact on daily life, that it is also restrictive, and I would think damaging.

4. In your opinion, which of the same Ministry of Magic decisions have had the BEST effect on present day wizarding life?
    a. The creation of the International Statute of Wizarding Secrecy in 1692.
    b. The defeat of the Appeal Against House-Elf Slavery in 1973.
    c. The drive into hiding of the surviving giants in the early 1980s.
    d. The 1865 decision to leave full control of Gringotts in goblin hands.
    e. The Wand Ban of 1631, which forbade Non-Human Magical Beings to carry wands.

Commentary:

Lisa: The Statute of Secrecy (a), for both Muggle and Wizarding reasons. Has Wizarding life improved since 1973? the 1980s? No, in fact the last half of the 20th century was a disaster for the Wizarding World. So we need to look deeper into history. I can't see the Gringotts' full control being super-important, and I think the Wand Ban was a mistake (see previous question). So that leaves the Statute of Secrecy, which coincides with the period of the 17th C "Enlightenment" in Muggle history. My guess is that it was beneficial because it lessened the friction between Muggles and Wizards.

Belinda: I chose (a) again for the same reasoning in number 3.

John: This one's a tossup too. I picked the Wand Ban (e), because it's what I think wizards would believe. I'm thinking about the Fountain of Magical Brethren, and how content wizards seem to be to live in ignorance of the rights of other creatures.

Lisa: Ooooh! What if full control of Gringotts ended the Goblin Wars? The timing is a little late if the wars happened during the 17th and 18th centuries (1600s and 1700s), but I think this is an intriguing possibility.

5. Which of the following popular historical theories have now been proven to be TRUE? Choose the correct THREE.
    a. The oldest building in Diagon Alley is Gringotts Bank; the other shops grew up around it.
    b. Towards the end of his life, Salazar Slytherin reconciled with the other Founders of Hogwarts School and returned to the castle to die.
    c. The Muggle 'War of the Roses' began as a dispute between wizarding neighbours over a Fanged Geranium.
    d. The second wife of King Henry VIII, Anne Boleyn, was accused by Muggles of being a witch, but was actually a Squib.
    e. A secret task force of Wizards and Muggles helped the Allies to victory in the Second World War.
    f. The Forbidden Forest began life as a wood planted and tended by a centaur herd.
    g. The Great Fire of London in 1666 was not, as Muggles believe, started by a blaze in a bakery in Pudding Lane, but by a young Welsh Green Dragon kept in the basement of the house next door.
    h. The Sorting Hat of Hogwarts was stolen and substituted by a group of delinquent students in 1325. The whereabouts of the real hat remain unknown.
    i. Upon his death in battle in 1762, goblin rebel Vargot was discovered to be a renegade house elf.
    j. The location and name of Hogwarts were both chosen by Rowena Ravenclaw, who dreamed that a warty hog was leading her to the cliff by the lake.

Commentary:

Lisa: Anne Boleyn (d), WWII (e), and the Great Fire (g), because I want them to be true.

John: What a fun question! (e) immediately made me think of Grindelwald and (h) of all the crazy theories around the Sorting Hat, so I assumed both of those to be distractions. (a), (f), (g), and (i) just seem to boring to me for Jo to pick them, and (b) doesn't fit with the books very well. I went with the Fanged Geranium, Anne Boleyn, and the warty hog. All VERY Jo-like stories.

6. Match the Minister of Magic with the major upheaval of his/her term in office, dates of which are marked.

6-1. Artemisia Lufkin (1798 - 1811)

    a. Attempted assassination by centaur
    b. Pureblood riots during Squib Rights marches
    c. Several of the oldest Wizengamot wizards walk out in protest at Minister's appointment
    d. Persistent denial of notorious Dark wizard's existence forces Minister's resignation after notorious Dark wizard appears at the Ministry of Magic
    e. Ghost demonstrations at the Ministry of Magic ("protest floats")
    f. A night of large-scale breaches of the International Wizarding Statute of Secrecy

Commentary:

Lisa: As the first female Minister of Magic, I think Lufkin's gender caused a walkout at the Wizengamot (c).

Belinda: By the second question in this set, I noticed that all the options were the same and since there are 6 answers and six questions, we must need to use each answer only once. So when I was unsure, I skipped a question and went back to them in order to eliminate some options. For this one I chose (c) as she was the first female MoM and that probably didn't sit well with the Old Crowd.

6-2. Grogan Stump (1811 - 1819)
    a. Attempted assassination by centaur
    b. Pureblood riots during Squib Rights marches
    c. Several of the oldest Wizengamot wizards walk out in protest at Minister's appointment
    d. Persistent denial of notorious Dark wizard's existence forces Minister's resignation after notorious Dark wizard appears at the Ministry of Magic
    e. Ghost demonstrations at the Ministry of Magic ("protest floats")
    f. A night of large-scale breaches of the International Wizarding Statute of Secrecy

Commentary:

Lisa: Centaurs, ghosts, and possibly Squibs were affected by events in Stump's terms in office because the official divisions between Being, Beast and Spirit were developed in 1811. The Centaurs, for example, protested the divisions by choosing to be classified as Beasts instead of Beings. The ghosts were also initially put in the Being category but successfully "asserted" the need for a "Spirit" classification. Squib rights in Wizarding governance are not known. I went with ghost demonstrations (e) because it seems to fit with them being "assertive."

Belinda: Yup, I went with (e) too, since we know from FB that the ghosts insisted they were not "beings" but clearly "has-beens", (I like that term! one of Jo's most clever puns, IMO.) and I think "protest floats" (as they can't exactly march) would be just the thing to convince Stump to create the separate divisions.

6-3. Faris "Spout-Hole" Spavin (1865 - 1903)
    a. Attempted assassination by centaur
    b. Pureblood riots during Squib Rights marches
    c. Several of the oldest Wizengamot wizards walk out in protest at Minister's appointment
    d. Persistent denial of notorious Dark wizard's existence forces Minister's resignation after notorious Dark wizard appears at the Ministry of Magic
    e. Ghost demonstrations at the Ministry of Magic ("protest floats")
    f. A night of large-scale breaches of the International Wizarding Statute of Secrecy

Commentary:

Lisa: Since it is unlikely that Spavin had whale ancestry, his nickname of "Spout-Hole" would seem to indicate that he was loquacious at best and a pompous gasbag at worst. The rest of his name has equine connotations. On a horse, a spavin is a swelling of the hock joint that results in lameness, while 'Faris' is a Muslim name meaning 'horseman,' or 'knight.' Anyway, he seems to me to have been the kind of Minister most likely to annoy the centaurs, so I vote for "attempted assassination by a centaur" (a).

Belinda: By process of elimination, my last answer left was (a) and it seemed to fit. With a name like Spout Hole Spavin, I'm sure he was not a friend of the Centaurs.

6-4. Nobby Leach (1962 - 1968)
    a. Attempted assassination by centaur
    b. Pureblood riots during Squib Rights marches
    c. Several of the oldest Wizengamot wizards walk out in protest at Minister's appointment
    d. Persistent denial of notorious Dark wizard's existence forces Minister's resignation after notorious Dark wizard appears at the Ministry of Magic
    e. Ghost demonstrations at the Ministry of Magic ("protest floats")
    f. A night of large-scale breaches of the International Wizarding Statute of Secrecy

Commentary:

Lisa: based solely on his tenure during the turbulent 1960s, I went with "pureblood riots during Squib Rights marches" (b).

Belinda: I chose (b) also, for the same reason as Lisa. Squib Rights marches and pure-blood riots (supremacy) fit with the timeframe.

6-5. Millicent Bagnold (1980 - 1990)
    a. Attempted assassination by centaur
    b. Pureblood riots during Squib Rights marches
    c. Several of the oldest Wizengamot wizards walk out in protest at Minister's appointment
    d. Persistent denial of notorious Dark wizard's existence forces Minister's resignation after notorious Dark wizard appears at the Ministry of Magic
    e. Ghost demonstrations at the Ministry of Magic ("protest floats")
    f. A night of large-scale breaches of the International Wizarding Statute of Secrecy

Commentary:

Lisa: Book 1 chapter 1, that's all I'm going to say.

Belinda: I agree, and chose (f). This would be "Harry Potter Day"! (and so cool that it is another confirmation of the Lexicon's timeline)

6-6. Cornelius Fudge (1990 - 1996)
    a. Attempted assassination by centaur
    b. Pureblood riots during Squib Rights marches
    c. Several of the oldest Wizengamot wizards walk out in protest at Minister's appointment
    d. Persistent denial of notorious Dark wizard's existence forces Minister's resignation after notorious Dark wizard appears at the Ministry of Magic
    e. Ghost demonstrations at the Ministry of Magic ("protest floats")
    f. A night of large-scale breaches of the International Wizarding Statute of Secrecy

Commentary:

Lisa: "You are blinded by the love of the office you hold, Cornelius!" (d).

Belinda: (d) Obviously.


PART TWO
International Wizardry
(Points available: 20 out of a possible 100)



7. Mark the following statements True or False

    7-1. There are witches and wizards living in every country in the world.
    a. TRUE
    b. FALSE

Commentary:

Lisa: True. I think the list of countries participating in the Quidditch World Cup is the best evidence of this.

John: True. Why would there be a country without them?

Belinda: I too said True. I imagine there are witches and wizards all over the world, like Harry, who don't even know they are magical, and I can't believe any nation or race would be exempt from magical tendencies. Now "living in" could be the significant phrase. Perhaps some countries are not hospitable to magical folks and so none live there. But I doubt this.

    7-2. Some countries have wizard royal families.
    a. TRUE
    b. FALSE

Commentary:

Lisa: Well, I want to believe it!

John: False. I think she’s trying to make us remember our speculation around who on earth the Half-Blood Prince was, before that book’s release.

Belinda: I said True. Don't know why... I just guessed that some countries' cultures would reflect the muggle culture. Or vice versa?

    7-3. The trade in flying carpets has been banned everywhere except the Far East.
    a. TRUE
    b. FALSE

Commentary:

Lisa: False. The term "Far East" is pretty nebulous, though it usually refers to China, Japan, North Korea, South Korea, and Taiwan. Quidditch Through the Ages says that carpets are used by our "Eastern brethren" and later lists India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Iran and Mongolia as countries where the carpets are common.

    7-4.The world's largest Centre for Alchemical Studies in situated in Egypt.
    a. TRUE
    b. FALSE

Commentary:

Lisa: I'm guessing on this one that is it true because of the huge role Egyptian philosophers like Hermes Trismegistus played in the history of Alchemy.

John: True.

Belinda: I don't know. But the typo in the question is Jo's not mine. I guessed and said False, thinking the law of averages.

    7-5. The age at which magic may be performed legally varies from country to country.
    a. TRUE
    b. FALSE

Commentary:

Lisa: True; I interpret Viktor Krum's ability to play Quidditch for a professional team to indicate that Bulgaria might have different age limit for magical majority.

John: It’s hard to imagine wizards having it together enough for this to be consistent. True.

Belinda: I said False. I think this is probably an international statute and maybe part of the Statute of Secrecy. Jo having said many times that a wizard comes of age at 17 in her world, makes me think its universal.

    7-6. Inter-country Apparition has been outlawed due to extreme Splinching.
    a. TRUE
    b. FALSE

Commentary:

Lisa: False (I'm guessing on this one).

John: I said False just because inter-country is a dumb distinction – it would make a lot more sense to simply outlaw long distances (Apparating within a big country is a lot harder than a quick jump across a nearby border).

Belinda: I agree with John's reasoning, and answered False. Because I doubt you can legislate smarts in the Wizarding World any more than muggles can. You can't save an idiot from Splinching himself trying something he's not capable of doing.

    7-7. There is a wizarding school in every country where wizards and witches are found.
    a. TRUE
    b. FALSE

Commentary:

Lisa: Hogwarts teaches the wizards of three different countries so this cannot be true.

John: The schools in the Triwizard Tournament would also seem an odd choice if there is a school in every European nation. Britain, Southern France, and Bulgaria? I bet they all pull from multiple countries.

    7-8. Portkeys may be arranged between countries only with the consent of both nations' Ministries of Magic.
    a. TRUE
    b. FALSE

Commentary:

Lisa: True; this makes sense to me. We know that portkey use is controlled within the UK, so it would make sense that they are a high level decision internationally.

John: True. It’s really a pain for wizards to travel long distances, isn’t it?

    7-9. It is illegal to send mail-bearing owls across international borders unless the owl has been granted authorisation.
    a. TRUE
    b. FALSE

Commentary:

Lisa: False; Sirius was able to do this when he was in the tropics.

Belinda: False, like Lisa said.

    7-10. The most persistent offender against the International Wizarding Statute of Secrecy is Scotland.
    a. TRUE
    b. FALSE

Commentary:

Lisa: Probably true.

John: Fantastic Beasts names Scotland as a persistent offender due to the Loch Ness Monster, so I’d buy it.

Belinda: I said True also. Besides, Jo lives there and look how much she alone has revealed! Wonder what steps the Ministry might be trying to take in order to Silencio her and Obliviate all of us?


PART THREE
Magical Theory
(Points available: 20 out of a possible 100)



8. Which of the following is CORRECT?
    a. Food can be conjured out of thin air.
    b. Any object can be Transfigured into food.
    c. Foodstuffs can be increased, Transfigured, summoned from a distance and magically cooked.
    d. It is impossible to make the inedible, edible.
    e. Food-related Charms are some of the simplest forms of magic.

Commentary:

Lisa: I have no idea on this one; I guessed "c." I hope this isn't movie contamination!

John: We’ve also seen most of the stuff under (c) happen in Molly’s kitchen.

Belinda: It seems to me that most of these answers are implying that it is not possible to magically create food. Just as a wizard could not conjure up money to become rich, one must not be able to conjure up food from nothing, turn rocks into bread, or eat something transfigured to "resemble" food. I thought this question was easy, I chose (d).

9. Which of the following is INCORRECT?
    a. An Animagus is able to perform a kind of Self-Transfiguration.
    b. An Animagus is able to perform a kind of Self-Charm.
    c. An Animagus is able to perform a kind of magic that is NEITHER Transfiguration NOR Charm.

Commentary:

Lisa: This one made my eyes cross. I guessed "c" because learning to be one is supposed to be so difficult.

Belinda: Hang on... which one answer is INcorrect? That means two answers have to be correct, and yet that seems contradictory. Choosing c would mean neither a nor b is correct, so it can't be c. I conclude that this means an animagus must need to perform two kinds of magic. I'll guess that one is Transfiguration, since that is Prof. McGonagall's specialty, and the second must be some other kind we don't know (the neither)... therefore I chose answer (b), it's not a Self-Charm.

John: I spent about five minutes trying to channel Hermione and figure this thing out logically, and finally realized that that alone doesn’t solve it. Given what we know about Transfiguration and Charms, though, it’s hard to imagine the animagus spell having anything to do with a Charm. So I’d say (b) is incorrect (and therefore the right answer).  

Lisa: I'm doomed!

10. Which of the following is/are POSSIBLE?
    a. Curing a poison victim without the correct antidote
    b. Curing a curse victim without the correct counter-spell
    c. Un-transfiguring a person or object without knowing what they were originally
    d. Transfiguring animals into humans
    e. All of the above
    f. None of the above

Commentary:

Lisa: Curing a poison victim (bezoar), so (a).

John: Choice (c) makes the previous question interesting. If the animagus transformation is indeed transfiguration, then nobody could have forcibly revealed that Scabbers was Peter Pettigrew except Lupin and Sirius. The real question, though, is whether a bezoar counts as an antidote. I'm guessing it doesn't, and that the answer is (a).

Belinda: I chose (e) all of the above. Although answer d troubles me, I do think its possible. If a human can be transfigured into an animal, such as a ferret, teehee... why not the other way? But I'm sure they keep the intelligence and character of their animal form. I swear I've met a few people who are really a donkey, turkey or slug.

11. Which of the following is/are IMPOSSIBLE?
    a. Transfiguring inanimate objects into animate objects
    b. Transfiguring animate objects into inanimate objects
    c. Vanishing inanimate objects
    d. Vanishing animate objects
    e. All of the above
    f. None of the above

Commentary:

Lisa: Pure guess, I'd say "all of the above" (e).

John: Well, we see plenty of inanimate objects vanished, fifth-years learn to vanish mice and kittens (OP16), third-years transfigure tortoises into tea kettles (PA16), and Krum transfigures a rock into a dog to distract his dragon during the first task (GF20), so none of them are impossible - must be (f).

Belinda: This is a question the Lexicon can really help with! On this Transfiguration page there is a list to go by. (Although I see that we need to update it for HBP, eek!) I said (f) because we have examples of all.

Lisa: Oh no! Caught again by the negative question.


PART FOUR
Dark Magic
(Points available: 30 out of a possible 100)



12. Which TWO of the following policies do you think would best serve the Ministry of Magic in its fight against the Dark Arts?
    a. Destroy all Dark Arts spellbooks
    b. Unforgivable Curses to be taught from year 1 at Hogwarts
    c. Outlaw sale of all goods that can be used in the Dark Arts
    d. Automatic life sentences in Azkaban for all convicted of Dark Arts crimes
    e. Improve Ministry of Magic Public Information Services
    f. Lift jinx on post of Defence Against the Dark Arts teacher at Hogwarts
    g. Persuade Boy Who Lived to front anti-Dark Arts publicity campaign

Commentary:

Lisa: Outlawing Dark items (c) and lifting Voldemort's curse on the Defense aganst the Dark Arts position (f) make the most sense. Some Dark Arts spellbooks might be able to teach one how to recognize and counter Dark spells so that's no good; we don't need more expertise in Unforgivables; Azkaban is like a sieve; the Ministry of Magic doesn't have a good track record of being helpful, and Harry is too controversial to be featured in publicity, even if he would agree to do it.

John: Here’s what bugs me about this question: it’s written by folks who work for the Ministry, right? So how would they know anything about the situations behind (e) and (f)? And then, given that the questions ARE on the test, should I still be assuming a ministry perspective behind the “correct” answers? If so, (f) is a clear choice, and the other is a tossup between (a) and (c). I’ll go with (a).

13. Which of the following is TRUE?
    a. To become an Inferius, a person must have been murdered by Dark Magic.
    b. Occlumency can guard against possession.
    c. Dementors are unknown in tropical climates.
    d. A curse is stronger than a hex, which is stronger than a jinx.
    e. If a werewolf mates at the full moon, they will produce a cub rather than a human baby.

Commentary:
 
Lisa: I'm torn between Occlumency (b) and the curse/hex/jinx statement (d).

John: Could one be murdered by magic other than Dark Magic? Is that too obvious? I’ll go with (a).

14. Which of the following is FALSE?
    a. Patronuses vary in strength according to which animal's form they take.
    b. There is only one documented case of a person surviving the Killing Curse.
    c. Hags have only rudimentary magic, similar to that observed in trolls.
    d. No defensive spell exists against the Cruciatus Curse.
    e. Giants have traditionally allied themselves with the Dark Arts.

Commentary:
 
Lisa: Both Harry and Voldemort survived the killing curse, so this one is false (b).

John: I wouldn’t count Voldemort as having survived the Killing Curse. I took (a) – I think the power of a Patronus has a lot more to do with the power and skill of the wizard than it does with the exact form it takes.

15. Match the dangerous being, plant or potion with the spell, substance or object that will conquer it.

15-1. Boggart
    a. Aconite
    b. Asphodel
    c. Bezoar
    d. Chocolate
    e. Expecto Patronum
    f. Fire
    g. Phoenix tears
    h. Riddikulus
    i. Sunlight
    j. Will
    k. Wingardium Leviosa
    l. Wormwood
    m. NO CURE

Commentary:
Lisa: Riddikulus (h)

John: From the books- "The charm that repels a boggart is simple, yet it requires force of mind.... We will practice the charm without wands first. After me, please ... Riddikulus!" (Remus Lupin, PA7)

Belinda: This one was Riddukulusly easy, (h). Thank goodness for a straightforward question I could be 100% sure of!

15-2. Dementor
    a. Aconite
    b. Asphodel
    c. Bezoar
    d. Chocolate
    e. Expecto Patronum
    f. Fire
    g. Phoenix tears
    h. Riddikulus
    i. Sunlight
    j. Will
    k. Wingardium Leviosa
    l. Wormwood
    m. NO CURE

Commentary:
Lisa: Expecto Patronum! (e)

John: From the books- "It is called the Patronus Charm.... When it works correctly, It conjures up a Patronus, which is a kind of anti-dementor -- a guardian that acts as a shield between you and the dementor" (Remus Lupin, PA12).

Belinda: Though Chocolate is a remedy for its effects, a patronus conjured with the Expecto Patronum spell (e) would conquer the Dementor itself.

15-3. Devil's Snare
    a. Aconite
    b. Asphodel
    c. Bezoar
    d. Chocolate
    e. Expecto Patronum
    f. Fire
    g. Phoenix tears
    h. Riddikulus
    i. Sunlight
    j. Will
    k. Wingardium Leviosa
    l. Wormwood
    m. NO CURE

Commentary:
Lisa: Sunlight (i)

John: From the books- "Hermione whipped out her wand, waved it, muttered something, and sent a jet of the same bluebell flames she had used on Snape at the plant. In a matter of seconds, the two boys felt it loosening its grip as it cringed away from the light and warmth" (PS16).

Belinda: I chose (f) Fire. I was tempted to answer Sunlight, thinking of the rhyme Hermione recites in the film, but in the book she remembers that Prof. Sprout teaches them Devil's Snare likes the dark and damp. Ron suggests lighting a fire, and she conjures Bluebell flames. (Note: I also chose this answer for Inferi later on).

15-4. Draught of Living Death
    a. Aconite
    b. Asphodel
    c. Bezoar
    d. Chocolate
    e. Expecto Patronum
    f. Fire
    g. Phoenix tears
    h. Riddikulus
    i. Sunlight
    j. Will
    k. Wingardium Leviosa
    l. Wormwood
    m. NO CURE

Commentary:
Lisa: Phoenix tears (g), since Wiggenweld potion (fw; Leticia Somnolens) isn't on the list.

Belinda: I was completely stumped on this one. We know that students in NEWT level potions class brew this, so there must be a suitable antidote, or perhaps the effects simply wear off after a time? No Cure? Asphodel and Wormwood are ingredients in this potion. would one of them work as an antidote? Perhaps like the fabled "hair of the dog that bit you" cure. But then there is the Wiggenweld Potion and the story from Somnolens' FWcard seemingly referring to the Sleeping Beauty legend. That would contradict my wearing-off theory. So hmm. Aconite is poison, that wouldn't be a good idea. a Bezoar is supposed to protect or save one from poisoning, but the Draught of Living Death isn't really a poison, is it? Phoenix tears have healing properties, but would someone under the effects of this potion be in need of healing? Most of the other options just don't apply. except Chocolate? Could a dead-like sleeping person consume chocolate? *sigh* I give up. I think I guessed (d), because chocolate is the only other substance besides Coffee that can bring ME back from near dead.

15-5. Imperius Curse
    a. Aconite
    b. Asphodel
    c. Bezoar
    d. Chocolate
    e. Expecto Patronum
    f. Fire
    g. Phoenix tears
    h. Riddikulus
    i. Sunlight
    j. Will
    k. Wingardium Leviosa
    l. Wormwood
    m. NO CURE

Commentary:
Lisa: Will (j)

John: From the books- "Look at that, you lot. . . Potter fought! He fought it, and he damn near beat it! We'll try that again, Potter, and the rest of you, pay attention - watch his eyes, that's where you see it - very good, Potter, very good indeed! They'll have trouble controlling you!" (Barty Crouch Jr. disguised as Mad-Eye Moody, GF15)

Belinda: Another one with a known answer, (j). Harry manages to fight off Crouch-as-Moody's Imperius in GF by his own force of will.

15-6. Inferi
    a. Aconite
    b. Asphodel
    c. Bezoar
    d. Chocolate
    e. Expecto Patronum
    f. Fire
    g. Phoenix tears
    h. Riddikulus
    i. Sunlight
    j. Will
    k. Wingardium Leviosa
    l. Wormwood
    m. NO CURE

Commentary:
Lisa: Fire (f)

John: From the books- "Dumbledore was on his feet again, pale as any of the surrounding Inferi, but taller than any too, the fire dancing in his eyes; his wand was raised like a torch and from its tip emanated the flames, like a vast lasso, encircling them all with warmth. The Inferi bumped into each other, attempting, blindly, to escape the fire in which they were enclosed..."(HBP26).

Belinda: Dumbledore uses (f) Fire against the Inferi in the cave. So I used this answer again. Hmm… fire is used a lot in the wizarding world! Wonder if we're going to see more of it?

15-7. Werewolf
    a. Aconite
    b. Asphodel
    c. Bezoar
    d. Chocolate
    e. Expecto Patronum
    f. Fire
    g. Phoenix tears
    h. Riddikulus
    i. Sunlight
    j. Will
    k. Wingardium Leviosa
    l. Wormwood
    m. NO CURE

Commentary:
Lisa: NO CURE (m), because sunlight only conquers it temporarily.

John: From the books- "But that fellow over there... Bitten by a werewolf, poor chap. No cure at all" (Arthur Weasley, OP22).

Belinda: I was torn between Sunlight and No Cure. I'm sure there is no cure for "being" a werewolf, but the sunrise might concur one during its transformation. But I decided that Jo had put in the answer sunlight to throw us off the fire answer to Devil's snare, and chose (m).


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